All posts by Trellis Blog Editor

Address Your Bias, Call BS, and Broaden your Networks: Interview with Monica Feliu-Mojer

Address Your Bias, Call BS, and Broaden your Networks: Interview with Monica Feliu-Mojer

 

As the CEFP 2017 cohort’s final installment in our Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) series, we interview Monica Feliu-Mojer, an award-winning PhD scientist-turned-communicator who leads communications and outreach for Ciencia Puerto Rico (CienciaPR), a global community of more than 10,000 scientists, students, educators, and allies transforming science education in Puerto Rico, democratizing science, and training young scientific leaders. Monica also works with the non-profit iBiology, leading science communication trainings and producing video stories that explore the intersection of the culture, identity, and research of underrepresented scientists.

 

Check it out: Monica is guest-editing a special issue on “Inclusive Science Communication in Theory and Practice” for Frontiers in Communications with Erika Check Hayden, Thomas Hayden and Raychelle Burks, inviting research papers, case studies and essays. 

Monica Feliu-Mojer
Monica Feliu-Mojer

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What do we do in the foundational training week of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program? Part one: the core curriculum.

Posted by Lou Woodley, CSCCE Center Director.

Last week we hosted the initial training week for this year’s AAAS Community Engagement Fellows. It’s an intense week with plenty of time spent together in the classroom and outside of it, and where we aim to do three things:

  • Equip the fellows with a shared understanding of some core community management principles – from how we think about scientific community managers to the role of strategy, programming and culture in the work that we do.
  • Surface the expertise that the Fellows already have – through lightning talks, small group discussions and the conversations that arise during the breaks and evening social events.
  • Nurture a sense of community between the Fellows so that together we create a trust-based cohort in which they can learn and support one another over the course of the year – and beyond.

So what materials do we cover during this foundational week? The curriculum builds each day to help fellows move from describing themselves and their own communities to appraising the strategies and tactics that they’re using – and how they might update them. By the end of the week they have plenty of tools and ideas to take back to their own organizations, as well as an understanding of the role that a community playbook or collaboration guide could play in their own work.

In this post we’ll give an overview of the core curriculum and in a second post we’ll outline the community playbook activities.

It's all about the teamwork! Image credit: Lou Woodley
It’s all about the teamwork! Image credit: Lou Woodley

Continue reading What do we do in the foundational training week of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program? Part one: the core curriculum.

Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: scientific communities convened by infrastructure/halo organizations

For our last installment of posts introducing our CEFP 2019 Fellows, we’d like to introduce you to those who support scientific communities convened by infrastructure/halo organizations.

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Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: national or international research collaborations

This week we’re announcing the selection of the 2019 cohort of Fellows for the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Now we’d like to introduce you our 4 Fellows supporting national or international research collaborations.

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Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: supporting local research collaborations

This week, we’re introducing the 2019 cohort of Fellows for the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program. We’ve already highlighted Fellows building online communities. Today, we’re introducing 4 Fellows who work with local research collaborations.

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Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: building online communities (non-scientific societies/associations)

This week, we’re introducing the 2019 cohort of Fellows for the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program. So far, we’ve highlighted building online communities for scientific societies and associations. Today, we’re introducing 5 more Fellows who are building online communities for non-scientific societies/associations.

Continue reading Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: building online communities (non-scientific societies/associations)

Meet the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows: online communities for scientific societies and associations

Last week we announced the selection of the 2019 cohort of Fellows for the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program and gave you a brief overview of how they’ll be spending their year with us. Now, we’d like to introduce you to each of them, starting with 4 Fellows who are supporting online communities for scientific societies and associations.

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“Use Books, Not People” & Other Advice from a Community Building Research Librarian

“Use Books, Not People” & Other Advice from a Community Building Research Librarian

Today we continue our series of regular posts on the Trellis blog for science community managers interested in diversity, equity and inclusion. This installment features an interview conducted by Rosanna Volchok, the New York Academy of Sciences. Additional series coordinators are Jennifer Davison, Urban@UW, University of Washington, Josh Knackert, UW-Madison Neuroscience Training Program, and Marsha Lucas, Society for Developmental Biology. You can find all of the posts in the series here.

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Introducing the 2019 Community Engagement Fellows!

Introducing the 2019 cohort of AAAS Community Engagement Fellows – #CEFP2019

We’re thrilled to be able to introduce the second class of AAAS Community Engagement Fellows, generously funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Fellows are professionals who build and nurture communities and collaborations within science – whether that’s on behalf of scientific societies, research collaborations or other convening organizations.

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Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2

Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2

2017 marked the first year of the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program (CEFP), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The first cohort of Fellows was made up of 17 scientific community managers working with a diverse range of scientific communities. As they continue to develop their community engagement skills and apply some of the ideas and strategies from their training, the Fellows will report back on the Trellis blog, sharing their challenges, discoveries, and insights. Here, Fellows Allen Pope, Amber Budden, and Stefanie Butland and mentor Aidan Budd discuss facilitating interpersonal community interactions in person.

Photo credit: Jaymantri, https://www.pexels.com
Photo credit: Jaymantri, https://www.pexels.com

As we discussed last time, the purpose of icebreakers is to bring together a group of people (e.g., professionals, students, community members, etc.) and facilitate social cohesion for the purpose of having them start learning together, benefit from shared experiences, and collectively ‘produce’ during the course of the event. These introductory activities start building shared understanding within the group and allow the group to begin to work toward shared goals.

You’ve chosen an activity or two that suits your community and your specific situation – now what?

Continue reading Breaking the Ice Well, Part 2